This motif is a reminder to the fact that thousands of liters of unstoppable glacial water are heading our way into offices and homes. It will not know rich from poor.

But it will know justice and find it.

First draft to a larger painting. Drawing and watercolor, 29 x 30 cm. Drawing: Ink, Watercolor, Pencil on Paper.
One of the first sketches, to the Painting “CLIMATE JUSTICE” is a creation of a specific image or series of images, forming the whole or part of a composition to be completed by adding pigment color (paints, colored inks, etc). This denotes a completed stand-alone autonomous work.

The Copenhagen Court House (Danish: Københavns Domhus) is a historic building located on Nytorv in Copenhagen, Denmark. Originally built as a combined city hall and courthouse, it now serves as the seat of the District Court of Copenhagen. Inaugurated in 1815, it was built to the design of Christian Frederik Hansen in Neoclassical style.

The facade is dominated by six large Ionic Columns, flanked by masonry with a minimal number of windows. Behind the columns a staircase leads up to the vestibule with four more Ionic columns. From here a complex network of corridors and stairs connects to the rest of the building. Although the courthouse has been renovated several times, the overall layout of rooms with columns, reliefs and stucco has been preserved.

On each side of the building, it is flanked by a large arch. On the left the arch provides a walkway above the street, connecting the courthouse to the jail on the other side. The jail building has an austere expression with small windows.

Both the facades of the courthouse and the jail feature inscriptions. The inscription above the entrance of the courthouse, “Med lov skal man land bygge” (English: “With law shall land [i.e. the nation] be built”), is a quotation from the preamble of Codex Holmiensis, while the inscription on the jail reads ” For almeen sikkerheden” (English: “For the public security”)

About Climate Change Art

Climate change art is art inspired by climate change and global warming generally intended to overcome humans’ hardwired tendency to value personal experience over data and to disengage from data-based representations by making the data “vivid and accessible”.[2] The intention is to “make an emotional connection…through the power of art”.

Climate change art is created both by scientists and by non-scientist artists.

jonas freydal

klimakunst climate change art